Tag Archives: detroit zoo

Leap into Conservation by Joining FrogWatch

Detroit Zoo | Mountain Chicken Frog

Detroit Zoo | Mountain Chicken Frog

ROYAL OAK, Mich. – The Detroit Zoological Society is encouraging Southeast Michigan residents to hop to it and join the local chapter of FrogWatch USA. The citizen science program teaches volunteers how to identify frogs and toads by their breeding calls and to gather and record data that supports a national network.

“We already know about the extinctions and crises amphibians face globally, but we don’t know what’s happening in our own backyards. FrogWatch allows us to monitor our native amphibians and make sure their populations are healthy,” said Detroit Zoological Society Chief Life Sciences Officer Scott Carter.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Detroit, Things To Do

Second Chance for Summer Zoomance August 21

 

Detroit Zoo - Summer Zoomance

ROYAL OAK, Mich. – Those who missed the first Summer Zoomance event in July will have a second chance to fall in love with the Detroit Zoo all over again. Another after-hours, 21-and-older Summer Zoomance will take place this Thursday, Aug. 21, 2014, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Admission for guests is $14.

Summer Zoomance allows grownups to relive their fond memories of the Detroit Zoo while creating new ones with a twilight stroll among the award-winning animal habitats.

The rain-or-shine event features performances by blues guitarist and vocalist Laith Al-Saadi, complimentary tram tours, animal enrichment and zookeeper talks.

Guests can take a spin on the Carousel for an additional $2 and enjoy a scenic ride through the Zoo on the Tauber Family Railroad for a one-way fare of $3. Food and adult beverages will also be available for purchase.

Tickets are available online at by clicking here and can also be purchased at the admission gates.

Image | Source

X

The Detroit Zoological Society is a nonprofit organization that operates the Detroit Zoo and Belle Isle Nature Zoo. Situated on 125 acres of naturalistic habitats, the Detroit Zoo is located at 10 Mile Road and Woodward Avenue off I-696 in Royal Oak, Mich. The Detroit Zoo is open 362 days a year, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. April through Labor Day (with extended hours until 8 p.m. Wednesdays during July and August), 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. the day after Labor Day through October and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. November through March. Admission is $14 for adults 15 to 61 and $10 for children 2 to 14, senior citizens 62 and older and active military with ID; children under 2 are admitted free. The Belle Isle Nature Zoo is open Wednesday through Sunday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. April through October and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. November through March; closed Mondays and Tuesdays. Admission to the Nature Zoo is free; however, a State of Michigan Recreation Passport is required for all personal vehicles to enter Belle Isle State Park. For more information, call (248) 541-5717 or visit www.detroitzoo.org.

Leave a comment

Filed under Detroit, Things To Do

New Penguin Conservation Center Video

By Jeffrey Buck

If you read yesterday’s article about the groundbreaking of the Detroit Zoo‘s new Polk Family Penguin Conservation Center you will enjoy this animated video of the stunning new structure.

Video | Source

X

X

X

Leave a comment

Filed under Detroit

William Davidson Foundation Fund Grants $3 Million To Support Polk Penguin Conservation Center

Detroit Zoo - Polk Penguin House

ROYAL OAK, Mich. – The William Davidson Foundation Fund has made a $3 million grant intention to the Detroit Zoological Society (DZS) to support the development of the Polk Penguin Conservation Center at the Detroit Zoo. Construction of the $26 million facility will begin in the spring near the Zoo’s entrance.

“This very generous grant will help us create an extraordinary conservation center of international significance for iconic polar animals – penguins of Antarctica. The center will highlight that incredible ice continent and the dramatic effect of global climate change,” said Ron Kagan, DZS executive director and CEO.

“The Detroit Zoo is known regionally, nationally and internationally as a leader in the field of animal welfare, science education and visitor experience,” said Jonathan Aaron, president, William Davidson Foundation. “Research and personal experience tell us that having strong cultural destinations, like the zoo, promote the region’s growth and vitality. We are pleased to support this worthwhile and exciting project.”

More than 100 design, engineering and construction jobs will be created and sustained for the estimated two-year development period of the Polk Penguin Conservation Center, and the facility will add several full-time employees to the DZS staff. With an associated annual increase of 100,000 visitors, the new attraction is expected to have a regional economic impact of several million dollars per year, adding to the $100 million economic impact the Zoo already has on the region.

Inspired by Sir Ernest Shackleton’s legendary Antarctic expeditions and epic crossings of the Drake Passage, the facility’s dramatic exterior design will evoke a tabular iceberg. The interior experience will feature 4-D effects such as arctic blasts, waves and snow, and will include a penguin “deep dive” with views above and below water as the birds dive and soar through a chilled 326,000-gallon, 25-foot-deep aquatic area.

For more information or to make a philanthropic investment in the Polk Penguin Conservation Center, visit http://dzoo.org/pcc.

The William Davidson Foundation, a family foundation, was established in 2005 in Detroit to honor its founder’s memory by continuing his philosophy of giving. It is committed to efforts to preserve and enhance Jewish life in the United States and abroad. In addition, the foundation is funding efforts to improve the economic prosperity of its home community in southeastern Michigan in order to make the region an even more desirable place to work and to live.

The William Davidson Foundation established the William Davidson Foundation Fund at the Community Foundation for Southeast Michigan in 2013.

Image | Source

X

Leave a comment

Filed under Detroit, Things To Do

Detroit Zoo’s Newest Star Gives Visitors Reason to Ooh-Ooh and Ahh-Ahh

Tom Roy / Detroit Zoo

Tom Roy / Detroit Zoo

ROYAL OAK, Mich. – Zuhura – Swahili for “morning star” – is the stellar name given to a female chimpanzee born in the early morning hours of August 10, 2013, at the Detroit Zoo’s Great Apes of Harambee.

Zuhura is the first baby born to mother, Chiana, 19, and the third in five years for father, Imara, 18, who also sired female Akira, 2, and male Ajua, 4, with 26-year-old Akati. The baby also represents the Detroit Zoo’s inaugural second-generation chimpanzee birth; mom Chiana was born at the Zoo in 1994 to Abby, who is now 30.

“It’s exciting to have three generations of chimps represented here,” said Detroit Zoological Society Curator of Mammals Robert Lessnau. “Chiana is proving to be a great first-time mom.”

Zuhura can be seen clinging to Chiana as she carries her around the Great Apes of Harambee. Visitors can spot them climbing trees outdoors on sunny days and hanging out in the habitat’s spacious indoor dayrooms during inclement weather.

The Great Apes of Harambee is a 4-acre indoor-outdoor habitat that houses chimpanzees, western lowland gorillas and drills. The primates spend their days foraging, grooming and playing, just as they would in their native African environment.

Zuhura’s birth is the result of a recommendation from the Association of Zoos & Aquariums’ (AZA) Species Survival Plan, a cooperative population management and conservation program for endangered and threatened species. There are 255 chimpanzees in AZA-accredited zoos in the United States, and Zuhura is one of only four chimps born this year.

The Detroit Zoological Society is a nonprofit organization that operates the Detroit Zoo and Belle Isle Nature Zoo. Situated on 125 acres of naturalistic habitats, the Detroit Zoo is located at the intersection of 10 Mile Road and Woodward Avenue, just off I-696, in Royal Oak, Mich. The Detroit Zoo is open 362 days a year, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. April through Labor Day, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. the day after Labor Day through October and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. November through March. Admission is $14 for adults 15 to 61, $12 for senior citizens 62 and older, and $9 for children 2 to 14 (children under 2 are free). The Belle Isle Nature Zoo is open Wednesday through Sunday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. April through October and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. November through March; closed Mondays and Tuesdays. Admission is free. For more information, call (248) 541-5717 or visit www.detroitzoo.org.

Image | Source

X

Leave a comment

Filed under Detroit, Things To Do

A Chick So Nice They Hatched It Twice

Penguin Hatch Detroit Zoo

The Detroit Zoo

ROYAL OAK, Mich. – The Detroit Zoo celebrated the birth of a macaroni penguin chick on May 25 – and celebrated its rebirth the next day. Using a rare and little-known technique previously employed with success on other bird species at the Detroit Zoo, animal care staff placed the incubator-hatched penguin chick back in its egg to be “hatched” again by a set of foster parents.

Typically, penguin eggs are incubated and hatched and the chicks hand-reared by animal care staff off-exhibit at the Detroit Zoo’s Penguinarium to better ensure their survival. The youngsters join the mature penguin colony about three months later, after they have fledged or grown their adult feathers for swimming.

“This is a rare opportunity for our visitors to see penguins rearing a chick,” said Detroit Zoological Society Curator of Birds Tom Schneider.

The chick’s parents are 25-year-old Needles, who laid the egg on April 19, and 8-year-old Diego. Because their nests are next to the habitat’s pool – a risky location for raising chicks – keepers pulled the egg for artificial incubation. After 36 days, a healthy chick was hatched, weighing 4.6 ounces – the Zoo’s largest macaroni chick ever. A DNA test will be conducted soon to determine the hatchling’s gender.

After observing that the chick was healthy and strong, keepers put it back in its egg and secured the top with tape. The egg was placed in the nest of 30-year-old Purple Girl and 12-year-old Tubby, who had made a nest in a safer location and were diligently incubating infertile eggs. Shortly after being placed in the foster parents’ nest, the chick “hatched” once again.

“The foster parents seemed a bit surprised by it all, but their parental instincts kicked in right away and both have been observed feeding ‘their’ baby,” said Schneider. “The chick appears to be thriving and we are very encouraged and excited.”

The macaroni penguin (Eudyptes chrysolophus) is a sub-Antarctic species found on islands surrounding Antarctica. Also known as a crested penguin, the macaroni gets its name from the bright yellow crest feathers that adorn its head. These plumes reminded early English explorers of an 18th century man, called a “macaroni”, who wore flashy feathers in his hat.

The Detroit Zoo currently has 27 macaroni penguins, including the latest addition, and is one of seven institutions in North America that is home to macaronis. The Penguinarium also houses rockhopper and king penguins and features a circular pool that allows the birds to swim continuously through their habitat.

Image | Source

X

Leave a comment

Filed under Detroit, Things To Do

Warthog Piglets Daphne and Violet Blossom at Detroit Zoo

The Detroit Zoo | Warthogs

The Detroit Zoo | Warthogs

ROYAL OAK, Mich. – Flowers aren’t the only things blooming at the Detroit Zoo. Daphne and Violet – female warthogs born April 7, 2013 – are now firmly planted in their African Grasslands habitat near the Africa Train Station.

The birth is the result of a breeding recommendation from the Association of Zoos and Aquariums Species Survival Plan, a cooperative management program to ensure genetically healthy, diverse and self-sustaining populations of threatened and endangered species. There are currently just over a hundred warthogs in North American zoos.

“We’re excited to have these baby warthogs and to help this small population in zoos grow,” said Robert Lessnau, Detroit Zoological Society Curator of Mammals. “The piglets are very cute and we’re happy to introduce them to zoo visitors.”

Female warthogs give birth to litters of two to six after a gestation period of five to six months. The babies’ mother, 8-year-old Lilith, and her twin sister, Rebecca, are named for characters from the television series “Cheers”. Daphne is named for a character from the sitcom’s spin-off “Frasier”. The father is 3-year-old Linus, whose namesake is a character from the “Peanuts” comic strip, as is Violet’s.

The warthog (Phacochoerus aethiopicus) has a large head with a flat face, high-set eyes and elongated snout. A mature warthog stands about 30 inches tall at the shoulder and can weigh between 125 and 300 pounds. Its stocky, muscular, almost-hairless body features wrinkly, gray skin; a long, coarse mane along its neck and back; and a long, tasseled tail.

Among the warthog’s most noticeable characteristics are the four large tusks protruding from the sides of its snout. The two upper canine teeth curve up and over the snout while the sharp lower canines are short and straight. The warthog also sports protruding facial warts which give the species its name.

Found primarily in the savannah woodland and grasslands of sub-Saharan Africa, the warthog is threatened by drought and hunting, which could result in localized extinctions in the future.

Image | Source

1 Comment

Filed under Detroit, Things To Do